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DNA nanotechnology: a future perspective

Muniza Zahid1, Byeonghoon Kim2, Rafaqat Hussain3, Rashid Amin1* and Sung Ha Park2*

Author affiliations

1 Interdisciplinary Research Center in Biomedical Materials (IRCBM), COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000, Pakistan

2 Department of Physics & SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746, South Korea

3 Ibnu Sina Institute for Fundamental Science Studies, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor Darul Ta'zim, Malaysia

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Citation and License

Nanoscale Research Letters 2013, 8:119  doi:10.1186/1556-276X-8-119

Published: 4 March 2013

Abstract

In addition to its genetic function, DNA is one of the most distinct and smart self-assembling nanomaterials. DNA nanotechnology exploits the predictable self-assembly of DNA oligonucleotides to design and assemble innovative and highly discrete nanostructures. Highly ordered DNA motifs are capable of providing an ultra-fine framework for the next generation of nanofabrications. The majority of these applications are based upon the complementarity of DNA base pairing: adenine with thymine, and guanine with cytosine. DNA provides an intelligent route for the creation of nanoarchitectures with programmable and predictable patterns. DNA strands twist along one helix for a number of bases before switching to the other helix by passing through a crossover junction. The association of two crossovers keeps the helices parallel and holds them tightly together, allowing the assembly of bigger structures. Because of the DNA molecule's unique and novel characteristics, it can easily be applied in a vast variety of multidisciplinary research areas like biomedicine, computer science, nano/optoelectronics, and bionanotechnology.

Keywords:
DNA; Nanotechnology; Biomedicine; Nanoelectronics; Nanosensors; DNA computation