SpringerOpen Newsletter

Receive periodic news and updates relating to SpringerOpen.

Open Access Nano Express

Nonlinear vibration behavior of graphene resonators and their applications in sensitive mass detection

Mai Duc Dai1, Chang-Wan Kim1* and Kilho Eom23*

Author affiliations

1 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Konkuk University, Seoul, 143-701, Republic of Korea

2 Department of Biomedical Engineering, Yonsei University, Wonju, 220-740, Republic of Korea

3 Institute for Molecular Sciences, Seoul, 120-749, Republic of Korea

For all author emails, please log on.

Citation and License

Nanoscale Research Letters 2012, 7:499  doi:10.1186/1556-276X-7-499

Published: 4 September 2012

Abstract

Graphene has received significant attention due to its excellent mechanical properties, which has resulted in the emergence of graphene-based nano-electro-mechanical system such as nanoresonators. The nonlinear vibration of a graphene resonator and its application to mass sensing (based on nonlinear oscillation) have been poorly studied, although a graphene resonator is able to easily reach the nonlinear vibration. In this work, we have studied the nonlinear vibration of a graphene resonator driven by a geometric nonlinear effect due to an edge-clamped boundary condition using a continuum elastic model such as a plate model. We have shown that an in-plane tension can play a role in modulating the nonlinearity of a resonance for a graphene. It has been found that the detection sensitivity of a graphene resonator can be improved by using nonlinear vibration induced by an actuation force-driven geometric nonlinear effect. It is also shown that an in-plane tension can control the detection sensitivity of a graphene resonator that operates both harmonic and nonlinear oscillation regimes. Our study suggests the design principles of a graphene resonator as a mass sensor for developing a novel detection scheme using graphene-based nonlinear oscillators.

Keywords:
Graphene resonator; Mass sensing; Nonlinear oscillation; NEMS